At the end of the nineteenth century the Weymouth Corporation Guide proudly advertised Weymouth as The English Naples
There you will find pure air, pure water, warm sunshine, bright sea, sweet sloping pebbly beach, firm fine sands, good bathing, boating, yachting, cycling, golfing. The distance from London is 142 miles, and the journey takes a few minutes over three hours.
Not much change there then.
See also the archive for a lot more about Victorian Weymouth.

Jan Jansson c.1650

For more old maps please see the maps page.


Robert Morden c.1695
 
Quite how Melcombe Regis and Weymouth switched places in the eighteenth century is unclear! Perhaps John Speed got it wrong and the mistake was perpetuated by Jan Jansson (left-hand map) and then by Robert Morden (right-hand-side). This mistake was perpetuated by several cartographers up until about 1770.
In any case, nowadays both Melcombe Regis and Weymouth are shown on the north side of the River Wey; Weymouth has expanded substantially to the south also and absorbed Wyke Regis, Westham and Radipole.
 

John Cary (c.1790)

R. Creighton (c.1830)


Bartholomew 1935

Weymouth Harbour, 1837      [click for larger image]


See also the archive for a lot more about Victorian Weymouth.